WKEB Local News Archives for 2020-07

 Potential Positive COVID Exposure at the Whittlesey Reds, July 26th Baseball Game

 Potential Positive COVID Exposure at the Whittlesey Reds, July 26th Baseball Game

 

The Taylor County Health Department has received notification of individuals who tested positive for COVID-19 who were present at the Whittlesey Reds, July 26th baseball game. 

 

Patrons who were at the game may have been exposed.  The Taylor County Health Department is encouraging anyone who was at the game to monitor for symptoms through August 9th, 2020.  Common COVID-19 symptoms include: fever or chills, cough, and shortness of breath and other symptoms that can be found on the Wisconsin Department of Health Services COVID-19 information page. 

 

If symptoms do develop, please contact your health care provider for further information.  We remind everyone to social distance, wear a facial covering when in public and unable to social distance, wash your hands, avoid large gatherings and stay home if you feel sick.      

 

Frequently asked questions about the Wisconsin face mask mandate

Frequently asked questions about the Wisconsin face mask mandate  July 30, 2020

 

Why are face coverings required? Cloth face coverings (or face masks) are recommended by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), the Wisconsin Department of Health Services (DHS), and healthcare professionals as an easy way to help prevent respiratory droplets from traveling into the air and onto other people when the person wearing the cloth face covering coughs, sneezes, talks, or raises their voice. Rates of COVID-19 have significantly increased in Wisconsin as more people return to work and have more interactions in public. Wearing face coverings is the simplest way to slow and prevent the spread of COVID-19 virus without requiring people stay in their homes.

 

When do I need to wear a face covering? You need to wear a face covering whenever you are indoors or in an enclosed space, other than a private residence, and other people are present in the same room or space. For example, you must wear a mask while you are shopping in a store or using a taxi.

 

When do I not need to wear a face covering? You do not need to wear a face covering if:

• you are at a private residence;

• you are outside; or

• you are indoors and no one else is present.

 

You can also remove your face covering in the following situations:

• When you are eating or drinking.

• When you are communicating with someone who is deaf or hard of hearing and you cannot communicate while wearing a mask.

• While sleeping (e.g., firefighters sleeping at a fire station).

• While swimming or being on duty as a life guard.

• When you are giving a religious, political, media, educational, artistic, cultural, musical, or theatrical presentation for an audience, so long as you have at least 6 feet between you and other individuals.

• When you are working if wearing a face covering poses a safety risk, as determined by government safety guidelines or regulations.

• When you need to temporarily remove your face covering to confirm your identify, such as entering a bank, credit union, or other financial institution or when having to show that you match your identification card when buying alcohol.

• When engaging in activities where federal or state law or regulations prohibit wearing a face covering.

 

Do I need to wear a face covering indoors, even if I can physically distance from other people at all times? Yes, you need to wear a face covering indoors unless you are at a private residence or you’re the only person in the room.

 

Do I need to wear a face covering when I exercise? It depends on where you are exercising. You do not need to wear a face covering if you are exercising in a private residence or outdoors. For example, you do not need to wear a mask if you are riding your bike on a trail. But you do need to wear a face covering if you are exercising indoors or in an enclosed space and other people are present, such as a gym, a cycling studio, or hotel workout room.

 

Do I need to wear a face covering when eating, drinking, or sleeping in indoor places other than my home? No. But you must put your face covering on again when you are done with these activities. For example, while you’re waiting for your table or waiting for a server to come take your order, keep your mask on. This includes outdoor restaurant and bar areas.

 

I have a medical condition that prevents me from wearing a face covering. Do I need documentation to prove that I don’t need to wear a face covering in public? No. You are not required to carry documentation to prove that you do not need to wear a face covering in public.

 

Does this order apply to private residences that are also used for business activity, such as a massage therapist who operates out of their home? No, the order does not apply to private residences.

 

Where can I get a face covering? You can make a face covering. The CDC provides both sew and no-sew instructions. You can buy a face covering from a store, including online stores. Also, many communities have programs where individuals can get a face covering for free. Check your neighborhood groups and community organizations for such programs.

 

Can I wear a face shield instead of a face covering? No. A face shield does not provide the same protections as a face covering. You are free to wear a face shield in addition to a face covering. But a face shield cannot be used in place of a face covering that would otherwise be required by this order. There may be situations where a face shield can be used instead of a face covering if you are engaging in work where wearing a face covering would create a risk to you, as determined by government safety guidelines, or if you are engaging in activities where federal or state law or regulations prohibit wearing a face covering. But that will depend on the specific government safety guidelines.

 

Are face coverings required inside businesses and office spaces? Yes, unless an exception applies.

 

Do I need to wear a face covering when in my car, in a ride-share service, or on public transportation? The only time you need to wear a face covering in your own car is if you’re traveling with people from another household. You have to wear a mask if you’re using a ride-share or on public transportation.

 

Where can I get more information on how to wear a face covering, safe practices for putting it on and taking it off, and when to wash face coverings? The Wisconsin Department of Health Services (DHS) has information on its website on wearing, cleaning, and making face coverings (https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/covid-19/protect.htm). Additional information can be found on the US. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) website (https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/clothface-cover-guidance.html). 

 

Will businesses be required to provide face coverings for their employees or customers? No. But many businesses may decide to offer face coverings to employees or customers and are encouraged to do so.

 

How will the face covering order be enforced? Local and state officials may enforce the order. Violating the order may result in a civil fine up to $200.

 

What do I do if I see someone not wearing a mask, even though they should be? Nothing. Some people have conditions or circumstances that would make wearing a cloth face covering difficult or dangerous. Just wear your mask and stay six feet away.

 

What do I do if someone is harassing me for wearing a mask? No one should have to endure harassment, for any reason. Contact your local law enforcement.

 

What if the town or city I live in already has a face covering or mask order? The Governor’s order sets a minimum bar. If your local government has stricter requirements, those requirements must be followed. 

Gov. Evers issues executive order declaring public health emergency and requiring face coverings statewide

Gov. Evers issues executive order declaring public health emergency and requiring face coverings statewide   July 30, 2020

 

MADISON — Gov. Tony Evers today declared a Public Health Emergency and issued an Emergency Order requiring individuals to wear face coverings when indoors and not in a private residence, with some exceptions as clarified and defined in the order. The order is effective at 12:01 a.m. on Saturday, August 1, 2020, and will expire on September 28, 2020, or by a subsequent superseding order.

 

“While our local health departments have been doing a heck of a job responding to this pandemic in our communities, the fact of the matter is, this virus doesn’t care about any town, city, or county boundary, and we need a statewide approach to get Wisconsin back on track,” said Gov. Evers. “We’ve said all along that we’re going to let science and public health experts be our guide in responding to this pandemic, and we know that masks and face coverings will save lives. While I know emotions are high when it comes to wearing face coverings in public, my job as governor is to put people first and to do what’s best for the people of our state, so that’s what I am going to do.”

 

Wisconsin is seeing new and significant community spread and increase in cases of COVID-19 which requires that we declare a new public health emergency and require face coverings. Wisconsin has experienced a drastic rise in COVID-19 cases throughout the entire state, with 61 of 72 counties (84 percent) representing 96 percent of the state’s population experiencing high COVID-19 activity. All regions of Wisconsin have high COVID-19 activity levels. This is a dramatic increase from where Wisconsin was in June when only 19 of 72 counties (26%) were experiencing high COVID-19 activity.  

 

The average number of new confirmed cases of COVID-19 has drastically increased throughout July, with an average of 556 new cases each day between July 1-7, an average of 764 new cases each day between July 8-14 (a 37% increase from the previous week), an average of 890 new cases each day between July 15-21 (a 16% increase from the previous week), and an average of 938 new cases each day between July 22-26 (a 5% increase from the previous week).

 

Under this order, Wisconsin residents ages five and older are required to wear a face covering when they are indoors or in an enclosed space with anyone outside their household or living unit. Face coverings are strongly recommended if you are outdoors and maintaining physical distancing is not possible. The order also enumerates exceptions to the requirement, listing activities such as when an individual is eating, drinking, or swimming. Individuals with health conditions or disabilities that would preclude the wearing of a face covering safely are also exempt from the requirement.

TESTING RESULTS FROM COVID-19 TAYLOR COUNTY TESTING EVENT

TESTING RESULTS FROM COVID-19 TAYLOR COUNTY TESTING EVENT  July 27

 

On Tuesday, July 21st, the Taylor County Health Departments and Taylor County Emergency Management hosted a coronavirus disease (COVID-19) drive-thru testing event at the Taylor County Fairgrounds.  The event was attended by residents from several different communities.  Overall, 130 individuals were tested for COVID-19.  Immediately following the event, the Wisconsin National Guard drove specimen samples to the lab for analysis.  All residents from the various communities have been informed of their results as of today.  Two positive cases were identified as a result of this testing from various communities.

 

“This event would not have been possible without our partners.  We can accomplish great things through collaboration,” said Patty Krug, Taylor County Health Department Director/Health Officer.  “We would like to extend a sincere thank you to the Wisconsin Department of Health Services, Wisconsin National Guard, Medford Police Department, Taylor County Highway and Maintenance Departments, and other individuals who made this event possible.”

 

As of today, Taylor County has 41 positive cases with 9 individuals recovered. 

Board pushes back Wisconsin fall sports

Board pushes back Wisconsin fall sports

 

The body that oversees Wisconsin high school sports is recommending schools conduct fall sports but delay start dates in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic.

 

The Wisconsin Interscholastic Athletic Association Board of Control held a special meeting to consider options for fall sports.

 

A motion passed during the Thursday, July 23, morning meeting to have two start dates for fall sports for the 2020-2021 school year.

 

Sports considered to be low risk, such as golf, swim and cross country would begin on August 17.

 

Sports considered to be high risk, such as football, soccer and volleyball would begin on the week of September 7.

 

Schools that are unable to participate in the fall will have the opportunity to move their fall sports to another period during the 2020-2021 school year. The details of this plan are coming at a later date.

 

The motion passed through the Board of Control on an 8-3 vote.

 

In the meeting, the WIAA board of Control stressed the importance of getting kids back into activities over having state championships for those sports. The idea of “regional” championships was also suggested.

 

There was amendment to have the higher risk sports start on August 24th, but that failed by a 9-2 vote.

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